Scientists prove that people vaccinated for shingles can infect others with chicken pox


For many years, the US government and mainstream media have continued to blame the unvaccinated community for the spread of infectious disease. We are constantly being bombarded with statements like the one written by Philip Ross and published in the International Business Times, which stated:

(Article by Claire Dwoskin republished from Info.CMSRI.Org)

“The American classroom has become a battleground for parents who are threatened by the growing number of children not vaccinated against measles, one of the most highly contagious viruses in the world. The ongoing measles outbreak in the U.S. that started at Disneyland and has spread to 14 states has raised concerns over the country’s rising anti-vaccination movement, including whether the decision to vaccinate against such a dangerous disease should be left to parents, and what constitutes responsible childrearing. Should a child whose parents chose not to vaccinate be allowed to share the same pencils and playground as children whose parents did?”

Although the International Business Times had attempted to present the public with a balanced review of the situation facing parents, it is questionable as to whether they presented any real evidence to support their claims and they left many readers with unanswered questions.

Shingles Vaccines Cause Chicken Pox in the Unvaccinated

zostavax shingles vaccine

In 2011, a team of scientists headed by Duane L. Pierson published the paper Varicella Zoster Virus DNA at Inoculation Sites and in Saliva After Zostavax Immunization.

Their paper discusses whether or not individuals vaccinated with the shingles vaccine can remain infectious with the chicken pox virus after they had been vaccinated. To investigate this concern in more detail, the team studied 36 individuals over the age of 60 who had recently been vaccinated with the shingles vaccine, Zostavax. The scientists discovered that although the vaccine was efficient in reducing the incidence of shingles in the elderly, many of the skin and saliva samples tested positive for the varicella zoster virus (VZV) DNA for up to 28 days after vaccination.

Read more at: Info.CMSRI.Org



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